Mallard Duck Research

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Jenn Sheppard is studying the movements and breeding success of Mallard ducks in New Zealand with Fish and Game. Last year I joined her team a few times to document different parts of the process, from implanting radio trackers, to tracking down the nests and ducklings when they hatched. You can read more about the project here!